How does your workplace make you feel?

New writing… My first piece for The Hub – the award-winning content platform curated by Mitsubishi Electric – explores the idea of the user experience (UX) driving the design of the built environment, particularly our workplaces. It discusses how differently commercial developers and their clients might do things if tenants and employees were to start rating the likes of their office environment in the same way as they rank hotels, or restaurants – scoring with stars and posting reviews. It considers what the implications would be for sustainability if happiness and wellbeing provided the prime metrics for post-occupancy evaluation and the key performance question to ask was simply: ‘How does your workplace make you feel?’

Workplace Wellbeing: Revolution of the mind

A version of this article – which explores the value of intangibles to workplace wellbeing, (Millennial) talent attraction and retention, as well as personal motivation and mindfulness, plus associated relationships between the Arts and Business – first appeared in Artworks Journal, Issue 04, Volume 01, Spring/Summer, 2014.

2013-06-07 21.29.13 HDR-1 copyIntangibles are like melted butter: Hot, slippery and likely to leave a mark. You can witness, but not see them; feel, but not touch; value, but not spend them (though maybe sell).
For a business world grappling with the new metrics of wellbeing and wonderment at work, intangibles carry the promise of inspiration and innovation. But how do you manage what you cannot measure? How do you budget for non-financials? How do you order the unknown?
Investment in the happiness and spiritual health of staff and the extended family of stakeholders can pay dividends in terms of triple-bottom-line performance, brand enhancement and positioning. As economic recovery gathers pace and Millennials flood the market, stakes are rising for staff recruitment, performance, satisfaction and retention. As a result, winning differentiators for an organisation and offer of employment are vital to understand and communicate.
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